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Posts Tagged ‘Creature Features’

It has been a while since I posted, but it’s been a busy few weeks, and something had to give. There have been out-of-town guests, and Worldcon, and preparing for out-of-town guests, and recovering from Worldcon, and just trying to get back on track with my writing projects. And now it’s football season and there are all those games to watch…

Whew.

So, Brian, you went to Worldcon. How was that?

So glad you asked. I am happy to report that, unlike Comic-con, there were no dessert-related disasters. In fact, there were no disasters at all. I wouldn’t say this was the best Worldcon I’ve ever attended, but it was by far not the worst.

The main problem I had was that (like Comic-con) you couldn’t get into any panels. The rooms chosen for most events were just too darn small. Even when we could get a seat, the room was SRO, and often we couldn’t get in at all. Please concoms, I know this is a tough deal (I’ve done it), but it doesn’t do any good to present exciting programming if people can’t get into the room to see it!

The other problem was simply one inherent in large cons: I couldn’t see the people I wanted to see. Specifically, I had hoped to connect with GOH Spider Robinson, because he was GOH at a con I chaired a looooong time ago. But due to circumstances, some beyond my control, that didn’t happen. Ah, well.

On the other hand, I did connect with several old friends from Northern California I rarely see, and that was special. One friend, attending her first Worldcon, even volunteered and may have discovered an inner geek that she (or at least I) never knew existed. It will be interesting to see where this goes.

I also found the dealer’s room quite intriguing, with quite enough booksellers to satisfy even one such as I–and by waiting to the last day, I scored several books I’d been looking for at a bargain price! (Then I had to ship them home, which was another matter…)

The high point, though, had to be the exhibit and programming surrounding Ghost of Honor Bob Wilkins, the legendary host of Creature Features, which formed so much of my youth. Seeing clips of Bob from the old days brought back happy memories, and maybe I even shed a nostalgic tear.

All in all, it was an enjoyable, if exhausting, experience. It may have to last me a while, since the next two Worldcons are overseas, and absent a Hugo nomination, I may not be able to attend. (Note to self: Write a Hugo-worthy story tonight.)

Speaking of writing, I am roughly 15% of the way into my latest book, and plowing ahead. I also have a story awaiting first-round editing, so that’s exciting. (That’s the word I want, right, “exciting”? Because “terrifying” also suggests itself…)

Oh, and I almost forgot: The Stolen Future and Nemesis novels are still on sale for $.99 for a limited time! Early Christmas shopping, anyone?

Busy as a bee, that’s me. I can’t wait for the distant day I can retire and write full-time. Then I’ll have time to relax, right?

#SFWApro

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It is widely disseminated that if you can take the science out of an SF story and still tell the story, it’s not truly SF. (For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll assume the same theory holds for fantasy.) I myself have believed for a long time that this is a valid, albeit somewhat simplistic, test. But now I wonder.

You see, there has been a lot of “science fiction” that does not really contain any “science.” So what do you call it? Star Wars is a prime example, with many characterizing it as “science fantasy” because it has the trappings of SF, but upon any review its science is well, bad.* Look at the spaceships: They don’t fly right. They act as though they’re in an atmosphere instead of a vacuum. (We’ll ignore the sounds. That’s artistic license.) And it’s based on “the Force,” a mystical energy field (later retconned to be some kind of micro-particles in your blood, but no one believes that). So is it science fiction? Or is it fantasy with spaceships?

I’m a fan of the 50s B&W monster movies I used to watch on “Creature Features.”** Giant ants, spiders, gila monsters, teenagers… Really, even I wasn’t buying it. But it was considered science fiction. Why? The science was worse than what you see in Star Wars. You couldn’t take the science out to see if the story could still be told, because there was no science. And yet we call it SF to this day. (And yes, that applies to Godzilla, too–all the versions.)

The question becomes, then: How do you test a story for being science fiction if there is no recognizable science in the story in the first place?

I guess you could try to recategorize Them! and Tarantula and Village of the Giants as science fantasy, but good luck.*** That ship has sailed (or launched). Better, I think, to avoid ironclad definitions and hope that the next generation of SF is better than some of the things that have gone before.

Or has that ship launched, too?

*When I say Star Wars, I mean the original. Since the first trilogy, it’s only gotten progressively worse.

**Creature Features was cancelled, and years later, revived. Ironically, the host of the new show was a friend of mine.

***These three movies share a distinction: Each had an actor who went on to achieve fame. (Them! actually had a couple.) Points if you can name them.

#SFWApro

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